"Part of what psychedelics do is they decondition you from cultural values. This is what makes it such a political hot potato. Since all culture is a kind of con game, the most dangerous candy you can hand out is one which causes people to start questioning the rules of the game."

— Terence McKenna (via jazminlandia)

(Source: lifeslushlips, via shkehvie)

"The meaning of life is just to be alive. It is so plain and so obvious and so simple. And yet, everybody rushes around in a great panic as if it were necessary to achieve something beyond themselves."

— Alan W. Watts (via narobe)

(Source: turiya-state, via thedevilisawakewithinme)

"Thoughts become things. If you see it in your mind, you will hold it in your hand."

— ― Bob Proctor (via psych-quotes)

(via buddha-has-a-boner)

Does anyone else see the geometric structuring of an eye?

Does anyone else see the geometric structuring of an eye?

(Source: you-are-another-me, via thedevilisawakewithinme)

technoccult:

Why Smart People Do More Drugs
Kevin Lovelace writes:

Evolutionary Psychologist Satoshi Kanazawa has recently been publishing a version of his Savanna-IQ Interaction Hypothesis over at Psychology Today. His theory, amongst many other things, establishes a connection between intelligence, novelity seeking and the consumption of psychoactive drugs. Or, as the Atlantic Wire put it: “Smart People Do More Drugs — Because of Evolution.” The quick version, hopefully without boiling it down too far, is that Kanazawa believes that more intelligent individuals are better equipped to deal with novel situations – and in fact seek those situations out. Thus, highly intelligent individuals are more likely to seek out experiences with psychoactive drugs, which are essentially novelty sinks. He’s not claiming that this behavior has a traditionally positive effect – in fact his wording shows a pretty strong bias against psychoactive experimentation but simply that people with high IQs are more likely to seek these experiences out. […]
What struck me, is not that he found proof of this tendency – eyeballing the amount of Ph.D’s in the room the last time I tripped has me anecdotally primed for such a conclusion – but how interestingly it matches Terence McKenna’s “Stoned Ape” theory of human cognitive development. While history and the fields of Anthropology or Evolutionary Biology haven’t been too kind to many of McKenna’s theories over the years since he passed away, one that continually strikes me as relevant – perhaps because of my own theories of hybridization and technological development – is the Stoned Ape.

Full Story: Grinding: The Return of the Stoned Ape
See also:
Smart kids more likely to be heavy drinkers
Brothers McKenna dossier
Art: Alex Grey

technoccult:

Why Smart People Do More Drugs

Kevin Lovelace writes:

Evolutionary Psychologist Satoshi Kanazawa has recently been publishing a version of his Savanna-IQ Interaction Hypothesis over at Psychology Today. His theory, amongst many other things, establishes a connection between intelligence, novelity seeking and the consumption of psychoactive drugs. Or, as the Atlantic Wire put it: “Smart People Do More Drugs — Because of Evolution.” The quick version, hopefully without boiling it down too far, is that Kanazawa believes that more intelligent individuals are better equipped to deal with novel situations – and in fact seek those situations out. Thus, highly intelligent individuals are more likely to seek out experiences with psychoactive drugs, which are essentially novelty sinks. He’s not claiming that this behavior has a traditionally positive effect – in fact his wording shows a pretty strong bias against psychoactive experimentation but simply that people with high IQs are more likely to seek these experiences out. […]

What struck me, is not that he found proof of this tendency – eyeballing the amount of Ph.D’s in the room the last time I tripped has me anecdotally primed for such a conclusion – but how interestingly it matches Terence McKenna’s “Stoned Ape” theory of human cognitive development. While history and the fields of Anthropology or Evolutionary Biology haven’t been too kind to many of McKenna’s theories over the years since he passed away, one that continually strikes me as relevant – perhaps because of my own theories of hybridization and technological development – is the Stoned Ape.

Full Story: Grinding: The Return of the Stoned Ape

See also:

Smart kids more likely to be heavy drinkers

Brothers McKenna dossier

Art: Alex Grey

(via buddha-has-a-boner)

View from the patio the other evening.

justbeingnamaste:

We are what we think.All that we are arises with our thoughts.With our thoughts, we make our world.Buddha

justbeingnamaste:


We are what we think.
All that we are arises with our thoughts.
With our thoughts, we make our world.


Buddha

(Source: a-psychedelic-soul, via thedevilisawakewithinme)

"

Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.

"

— Albert Einstein (via pentagrandma)

(Source: adingintheuniverse, via thedevilisawakewithinme)

"

افتح فمك فقط إن كان ما ستقوله أجمل من الصمت


Open your mouth only if what you are going to say is more beautiful than silence

"

— Arabic Proverb (via kissing-beehives)

(Source: havesabr, via seraphism)